In Conversation

Gil Scott-Heron

Episode Summary

In 2001, our friends at Canongate Books presented a concert with Gil Scott-Heron in Scotland. Jamie Byng from Canongate was a longtime friend and supporter of Scott-Heron. In this recording, Scott-Heron exudes a sense of comfort from performing in the company of friends, including the percussionist Larry McDonald. Canongate passed this recording to dublab for an exclusive broadcast in 2001. We’re happy to be able to share exerts from the performance again for this episode of In Conversation.

Episode Notes

Gil Scott-Heron In Conversation with the audience

In 2001, our friends at Canongate Books presented a concert with Gil Scott-Heron in Scotland. Jamie Byng from Canongate was a longtime friend and supporter of Scott-Heron. In this recording, Scott-Heron exudes a sense of comfort from performing in the company of friends, including the percussionist Larry McDonald. Canongate passed this recording to dublab for an exclusive broadcast in 2001. We’re happy to be able to share exerts from the performance again for this episode of In Conversation.

Gil Scott-Heron, a seminal American musician, writer, and performer, began his career in the early 1970's with the albums Small Talk at 125th and Lenox and Pieces of a Man. He blended jazz, blues, political expression and spoken word to create a unique genre he called “bluesology.” Inspiring the generations that came after, his work is considered by many to be one of the forebears of rap and neo-soul. One of his most well known poems, The Revolution Will Not Be Televised, has entered into our collective imaginations becoming a touchstone in mainstream culture.

In Conversation is produced by dublab. Sound editing, theme song and additional music for this episode by Matteah Baim. Due to rights reasons music from the original broadcast has been removed. To hear more, please visit dublab.com. A special thanks to Jamie Byng, Peter Collinridge and Canongate Books.